Sex After Rape

Below is an excerpt from an excellent post called “12 Things No One Told Me About Sex After Rape.” Please go to the authors site and read the entire thing.

In reading this, I feel a sense of solidarity and hope. Some of these 12 things I’ve already experienced, others I’ve yet to. It’s been over a year since I’ve had sex, as I’m not willing to have dissociative sex anymore. The entire subject is rather distasteful for me now, which is problematic as an erotic romance author. Needless to say, I no longer write erotica.

Fortunately, I live #7 every day, as I’m married to an amazing and supportive man. Since I’m still in the place that this article begins, sex, for now, is not a viable option.

There is a strange sort of unspoken theory that once a woman has been raped, sex is no longer a viable option for her. Sex has been replaced by trauma, fear, pain, and anxiety. I’m not saying this is never the case. Every survivor’s story and experience is different, but too often the assumption is that if you have been raped, you are sexually broken and forever unfixable. That sort of discourse is not healthy or empowering or even sympathetic. What I want to say is what I wish I had been told: rape is not a form of sex, it is a form of assault. Sex feels good. Assault is traumatizing. It is possible for sex to exist after rape because they are different experiences, just like it’s possible for you to still enjoy going out to eat even if you got food poisoning once. You might never go back to that restaurant again, but it doesn’t mean you will get food poisoning every time you go out.

Admittedly, I don’t know what sex before rape is like. I lost my virginity to rape at 14. People are willing to give a lot of guidance on what a survivor is supposed to do after her rape. Do not change clothes. Do not shower. Have someone you trust take you to the hospital. Report it immediately to law enforcement. Reach out to loved ones, find a therapist, become an advocate for other survivors. But it’s been 10 years and these are the things nobody told me about sex after rape:

1. Nobody tells you that you’ll feel guilty the first time you have a crush on a guy after your rape. Aren’t you supposed to hate men now? I mean, ugh, penises are evil and one ruined your life. You shouldn’t even be thinking about boys. That’s what got you in trouble in the first place. (Oh, hey rape culture, how’d you get here?)

2. Nobody tells you that you’ll be called a tease when you draw the line at making out. Even though you’re pretty proud of yourself for this minor victory on your path to regaining any confidence in expressing your sexuality, some people will think you’re a prude because you won’t take off your pants.

3. Nobody tells you that the first time you do take off your pants in front of a potential partner you’ll cry almost immediately and put them back on, leaving without an explanation. You’ll feel embarrassed and stupid and you’ll wonder if you’re ever going to be capable of intimacy ever again.

4. Nobody tells you that masturbation is a healing practice (OK, maybe your therapist suggested it once or twice) and that realizing you’re capable of sexual satisfaction after rape is an incredible, powerful feeling. Sometimes it takes a while to feel wholly reunited with your body in this way, and you’re allowed to take all the time you need. Sexual exploration is a journey, not a destination.

5. Nobody tells you that your PTSD symptoms will be scoffed at. Your boundaries will be called “arbitrary” and you will be accused of “wielding sex as a weapon” and “putting yourself on a pedestal.” Someone should tell you that people who say these things are the worst type of people to be around. They have no right to make you feel ashamed, but they will. If they have the potential to get angry about the choices you make about what you do with your body, they are not worth your time or energy or thought or love. But nobody tells you that.

6. Nobody tells you that the ‘rape talk’ will be a thing that has to happen before any romantic relationship gets too serious. Nobody lets you know that immature men will freak out and refer to your rape as “baggage” when they cut things off. And unfortunately, nobody mentions that some men will hold your hand and weep with you when you tell them, because they can’t believe anyone would be capable of hurting you.

7. Nobody tells you that there are men who are patient and kind. Some men will listen and support you and they will read and research and seek to understand. They will ask you what you like and what you don’t like, they will be explicit about their concerns, and they will treat you with respect and dignity.

Please read the last five here…

#8 is really a big fear of mine, actually. Just thinking about it is triggering.

#9 gives me hope

#10, every fucking day

-_Q

Olivia M. Grey lives in the cobwebbed corners of her mind writing paranormal romance with a Steampunk twist, like the Amazon Gothic Romance bestseller Avalon Revisited. Her short stories and poetry have been published in various magazines and anthologies, like SNM Horror Magazine and How the West Was Wicked. Ms. Grey also blogs and podcasts relationship essays covering such topics as alternative lifestyles, deepening intimacy, ending a relationship with love and respect, and other deliciously dark and decadent matters of the heart and soul.

Read more by O. M. Grey on her blog Caught in the Cogs, http://omgrey.wordpress.com

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3 Comments

Filed under Hope

3 responses to “Sex After Rape

  1. Megan

    I love this article. I applaud how you are able to share these things. I was sexually assaulted at 12, 14, and 18. I was celibate for most of my early 20’s, 5 years, in fact. Now, at 30, I am in a happy stable relationship and have a little toddler and love sex. EMDR, I have found, is incredibly effective at reducing the symptoms of post-traumatic stress. I especially love how it reduces all of the noise around my trauma. You know, those silly and insignificant details that I latch onto and can’t get away from, like his smell or something that he said to me. Its amazing.

    • I’m so pleased to hear you’re doing so well! I have been briefly introduced to EMDR, but the therapist who showed me the basics also told me I needed to “have some compassion” for my rapist and that the reason I was so upset about being raped is my own ego and because of the way I think about rape. So, EMDR kinda got attached to the secondary trauma of that awful therapist; however, I’m far enough away from that now, so I might give EMDR another try. Thank you.

      • Megan

        I’m so sorry that that therapist was so negative. Research has shown that it is incredibly effective with PTSD. It utilizes a mild hypnotic state to help the survivor get to the heart of the matter. If you are susceptible to hypnotic suggestion (as I am), its very very effective. It is not generally taught in most in counseling programs. Your therapist just may not have been educated in proper use of EMDR. Perhaps your therapist’s ego was being projected onto you…

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